Regional BTSA projects

Addressing the poaching threat 

Wildlife poaching is a major issue in Latin America but its impact on the tapir population was unclear. The BTSA sought to evaluate the effects of hunting on tapirs populations across its range, understand the causes underlying the problem, and work on strategies together with key local actors to decrease this threat.

Raise tapir awareness through education

We work in the education of children and young people mainly in the areas bordering the forests with the presence of tapirs. The objective is to increase the knowledge of the ecological importance of tapirs for the well-functioning of the ecosystem and humans. In addition, we motivate children and young people to feel pride of still having such an important species living in their forests. We use education programs such as Tapir Tracks, Salva-dantas, and materials developed by CECON-USAC.

 

Ecology of tapirs 

Conservation goes hand in hand with science. Despite being a massive animal, much needs to be uncovered about the life of the Baird’s tapir. We use camera trapping and GPS-telemetry to study the behaviour and ecology of tapirs, especially their habitat use, home range, movement pattern, interactions with other individuals, population trend,  and ultimately monitor their conservation status throughout the region. 

 

Community patrols 

 Across the region, the BTSA helps indigenous and local communities to improve their capacity to patrol and defend their territories and community forests. This includes the implementation of the Spatial Monitoring and Reporting Tool (SMART) in Nicaragua’s Indio Maíz Biological Reserve and Panama’s Darién National Park and a host of other strategies, in collaboration with the local competent authorities.

 

Towards a better coexistence with tapirs

We work in the education of children and young people mainly in the areas bordering the forests with the presence of tapirs. The objective is to increase the knowledge of the ecological importance of tapirs for the well-functioning of the ecosystem and humans. In addition, we motivate children and young people to feel pride of still having such an important species living in their forests. We use education programs such as Tapir Tracks, Salva-dantas, and materials developed by CECON-USAC.